You are currently viewing 40+ Parts of a plant in English with pictures and explanations

40+ Parts of a plant in English with pictures and explanations

Learning about the parts of a plant and a flower is important because it helps us understand plant biology, growth, and reproduction. This knowledge aids in effective gardening, agriculture, and crop management.

Additionally, it raises awareness of the roles plants and flowers play in ecosystems, promoting conservation and biodiversity protection. Many plant and flower parts have medicinal and nutritional value, contributing to daily health and diet.

Understanding these parts is also fundamental in education, enhancing our scientific knowledge and appreciation of nature.

In this article, we provide you with vocabulary related to the parts of a plant and a flower, through images and examples.

1. Parts of A Plant

A plant is composed of several essential parts, each with its unique function.

  1. Roots: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil and anchor the plant.
  2. Stem: The stem supports the plant and transports water and nutrients from the roots to the leaves and flowers.
  3. Leaves: Leaves conduct photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration, converting sunlight into energy and regulating water balance.
  4. Flowers: Flowers are the reproductive organs, facilitating pollination and seed production.
  5. Fruits: Fruits protect seeds and aid in their dispersal, helping plants spread to new areas.
  6. Seeds: Seeds store the plant embryo and provide nutrients for it to grow into a new plant.

2. List of plant vocabulary

Parts of a tree

Seed

Sprout

Stem

Leaf

Berry

Bud

Flower

Fruit

Twigs

Branch

Limb

Foliage

Bole

Trunk

Roots

Lateral root

Root hairs

Taproot

Pith

Outer Bark

Inner Bark

Cambium

Sapwood

Heartwood

Seed

Seedling

Sapling

Young Tree

Mature Tree

 

 

Parts of a Flower

parts of a flower

 

Pollen

Stigma

Sepal

Stalk

Petal

Bud

Style

Ovules

The life cycle of a tree

Learning about the life cycle of a tree is important because it helps us understand the vital roles trees play in ecosystems, such as providing oxygen, improving air quality, conserving water and soil, and supporting biodiversity.

Seed

Seedling

Sapling

Young Tree

Mature Tree

Snag

Decline and Death

3. Plant Parts Vocabulary with Pictures and Examples

List of Plant Vocabulary:

Seed: Seeds contain the plant embryo, protecting and providing nutrients for it to grow into a young plant. Seeds have a protective outer coat, enabling them to withstand harsh environmental conditions. When conditions are favorable, seeds germinate and grow into new plants, continuing the plant’s life cycle.

Example: “Plant the seed in fertile soil for it to grow.”

Seed - parts of a tree

Fruits:

Fruits are the end product of flowers after pollination and fertilization. They contain seeds, protecting and nourishing them as they develop. When fruits ripen, they often have attractive colors and scents to entice animals to eat them, thus aiding in seed dispersal to new areas, allowing the plant to spread and grow.

fruits

Sprout: A new growth from a seed, appearing as a small shoot.

Example: “The seed began to sprout after a few days.”

Sprout

Stem: The stem is the main axis of the plant, supporting branches, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Its crucial function is to transport water and nutrients from the roots to other parts of the plant. Additionally, the stem stores nutrients and, in some plants, participates in photosynthesis.

Example: “The stem of the plant is tall and sturdy.”

Stem

Leaf: Leaves are the parts of the plant where photosynthesis takes place, converting sunlight into chemical energy to nourish the plant. Leaves also play a role in respiration and transpiration, helping to regulate temperature and water balance in the plant. Leaves come in various shapes and sizes, depending on the plant species.

Example: “The leaf absorbs sunlight to produce food for the plant.”

Leaf

Berry: A small, fleshy fruit containing seeds.

Example: “The bush is covered with ripe berries.”

Berry

Bud: An undeveloped or embryonic shoot that can form leaves or flowers.

Example: “The rose bush has several buds ready to bloom.”

Bud

Flower: Flowers are the reproductive parts of the plant, where pollination and fertilization occur. They often have bright colors and fragrances to attract insects and birds for pollination. After pollination, flowers develop into fruits that contain seeds, continuing the plant’s life cycle.

Example: “The flower attracts bees for pollination.”

Flower

Twigs: Small branches or shoots growing from a main branch or stem.

Example: “The bird built its nest using twigs.”

Twigs

Branch: A limb growing from the trunk or a bough of a tree.

Example: “The branch swayed in the wind.”

Branch

Limb: A larger branch of a tree.

Example: “The heavy limb broke off during the storm.”

Limb

Foliage: The leaves of a plant collectively.

Example: “The foliage turned bright red in the fall.”

Foliage

Bole: The main stem or trunk of a tree.

Example: “The bole of the tree is very thick and sturdy.”

Bole

Trunk: The main woody stem of a tree.

Example: “The trunk of the old oak tree is covered in moss.”

Trunk

Roots:

Roots are a vital part of the plant, located underground. They absorb water and nutrients from the soil, providing the essential resources the plant needs to grow. Additionally, roots anchor the plant, keeping it stable and protecting it from external forces.

Example: “The roots spread out to find water.”

Roots

Lateral root: Smaller roots that extend from the primary root.

Example: “The lateral roots help stabilize the plant.”

Lateral root

Root hairs: Tiny extensions of root cells that increase surface area for absorption.

Example: “Root hairs are essential for absorbing nutrients from the soil.”

Root hairs

Taproot: A large, central root from which other roots sprout laterally.

Example: “A carrot is an example of a plant with a taproot.”

Taproot

Pith: The soft, spongy tissue in the center of plant stems.

Example: “The pith stores nutrients for the plant.”

 

Outer Bark: The protective outer covering of the tree trunk.

Example: “The outer bark protects the tree from insects.”

Inner Bark: The layer of bark just inside the outer bark, responsible for transporting nutrients.

Example: “The inner bark, or phloem, carries nutrients throughout the tree.”

 

Cambium: A layer of actively dividing cells between the xylem and phloem.

Example: “The cambium layer helps the tree grow in diameter.”

 

Sapwood: The younger, outermost wood that transports sap.

Example: “The sapwood is lighter in color than the heartwood.”

Heartwood: The older, non-living central wood of a tree, providing structural support.

Example: “The heartwood is very dense and strong.”

 

Seedling: A young plant, especially one raised from a seed.

Example: “The seedling needs plenty of sunlight to grow.”

Seedling

Sapling: A young tree, especially one with a slender trunk.

Example: “The sapling was planted to replace the old tree.”

Sapling

Young Tree: A tree that has not yet reached maturity.

Example: “The young tree is growing rapidly each year.”

Young Tree

Mature Tree: A fully grown and developed tree.

Example: “The mature tree provides plenty of shade.”

 

Parts of a Flower

 

Pollen: A fine powder produced by the male part of the flower, used in fertilization.

Example: “Bees collect pollen from flowers to make honey.”

Pollen

Stigma: The part of the flower that receives pollen during pollination.

Example: “The stigma is sticky to catch pollen grains.”

Stigma

Sepal: The outer parts of the flower that protect the developing bud.

Example: “The green sepals enclose the flower bud.”

Sepal

Stalk: The stem that supports the flower.

Example: “The flower stalk holds the bloom upright.”

 

Petal: The colorful parts of a flower that attract pollinators.

Example: “The bright petals attract bees and butterflies.”

Petal

Bud: An undeveloped flower or leaf.

Example: “The flower bud will bloom into a beautiful rose.”

Bud

Style: The stalk that connects the stigma to the ovary.

Example: “The style supports the stigma and allows pollen tubes to grow.”

Style

Ovules: The structures in the ovary that develop into seeds after fertilization.

Example: “The ovules are fertilized by pollen to form seeds.”

 

The stages of a tree’s life cycle explained with examples:

The life cycle of a tree refers to the sequence of developmental stages that a tree undergoes throughout its lifetime, from germination as a seed to death and decay. These stages typically include:

Seed: This is the initial stage when a seed germinates and begins to grow into a young plant.

Example: The acorn seed germinated and sprouted a tiny oak seedling.

Seed - parts of a tree

Seedling: This stage follows germination, where the plant has developed a stem and young leaves.

Example: The maple seedling grew taller and developed its first set of leaves.

Seedling

Sapling: A sapling is a young tree that has grown beyond the seedling stage, with a thicker trunk and possibly small branches.

Example: The sapling oak tree was sturdy enough to withstand strong winds.

Sapling

Young Tree: This stage signifies further growth with a well-established trunk and several secondary branches.

Example: The young pine tree in the backyard provided ample shade during hot summer days.

Young Tree

Mature Tree: A mature tree is fully grown, often capable of reproduction, and typically reaches its largest size.

Example: The mature chestnut tree bore abundant nuts each fall, attracting squirrels and birds.

 

Snag: A snag is a standing dead tree that can still provide habitat for wildlife even after it has stopped growing.

Example: The snag of the old oak tree was a nesting site for woodpeckers and owls.

Snag

Decline and Death: Eventually, the tree may enter a phase of decline due to aging, disease, or environmental factors, leading to its death.

Decline and Death

Read more:

List of Flowers: 50+ Flower Names with Images

 

Trả lời